Lem Satterfield

Video: Mayweather

Victor Ortiz told MaxBoxing.com that he was attempting to break the nose of Floyd Mayweather Jr. with an intentional headbutt before being dethroned as WBC welterweight titleholder by fourth round knockout in their bout at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas on Sept. 17.

“I was trying to break his nose. 100 percent. Because he nailed me 16 times with his elbow on my right eye, which made me close my eye. The last one, I kept telling [referee Joe] Cortez, ‘elbow.’ But he says, ‘keep fighting, Victor, keep fighting Victor.’ I said, ‘alright.’ I took four before…and I kept calling them, ‘elbow,’” said the 24-year-old Ortiz (29-3-2, 22 KOs) during a recent interview with Maxboxing.com concerning his actions against Mayweather (42-0, 26 KOs).

“[Cortez said] ‘keep fighting, Victor.’ [Ortiz responded] ‘Alright, alright, here we go.’ I get him against the ropes, fourth round. Boom! I’m catching him. He catches me right on my eye. One more time on my eye. Just straight in my eye. There’s even pictures of it. Right in my eye. My eye gets closed. So I unleashed a head butt.”

 

Boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. is due to take a plea deal in Las Vegas to avoid trial on

felony allegations that he battered his ex-girlfriend.

The 34-year-old Mayweather is expected to plead guilty Wednesday in Las Vegas Justice

Court to misdemeanor battery domestic violence and harassment charges.
Floyd Mayweather Jr. could be sentenced to between two days and 18 months in jail.
(Getty Images)

An aide to Clark County District Attorney David Roger says Mayweather could be

sentenced to $3,000 in fines and between two days and 18 months in the Clark County

jail.

The plea deal avoids an evidentiary hearing on felony grand larceny, coercion and

robbery charges, plus misdemeanor domestic battery and harassment charges in a

September 2010 argument involving Mayweather’s ex-girlfriend and two of their

children.

The undefeated prizefighter could have faced 34 years in state prison if convicted of

all charges.

“I was waiting for him to get up. That’s what I’m saying. I’m saying that either he

looked up and was thinking about life and said, ‘I don’t think I want to do this,’ and

just stayed down, or I don’t know. That was the crazy thing about it. I got so many

phone calls,” said Berto.

“It’s just like I’ve never in my life seen somebody so happy to get knocked out.

Never. Never. They stopped the fight and he’s up smiling, hugging, kissing everybody

around him. I mean, you know, walking back to the dressing room laughing, smiling. At

his after-party, posing and stuff? I’m like, ‘dude.’”

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