Lem Satterfield

Bey tests positive for testosterone

Unbeaten lightweight prospect Mickey Bey, of Cleveland, has tested positive for high levels of testosterone in the wake of his third-round knockout of Robert Rodriguez on Feb. 2 at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, according to Nevada State Athletic Commission executive director Keith Kizer.

“He tested for elevated testosterone and a heavy testosterone ratio,” said Kizer of Bey, a 29-year-old with a record of 19 -0-1 that includes 10 knockouts.

“That indicates the use of synthetic testosterone, which is an anabolic agent. These are just allegations at this point, so a complaint has been served on him, and he’ll have a full and fair  opportunity to respond to the allegations.”

While Nevada’s rules allow for a maximum testosterone to epitestosterone ratio of six-to-one, Bey’s was greater than 30-to-one, according to Kizer.

In March 2012, IBF junior welterweight beltholder Lamont Peterson failed a drug test that was contractually administered at his choosing by the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association (VADA), coming up dirty for synthetic testosterone.

Peterson’s infraction led to his being stripped of the WBA’s belt he won from Amir Khan. Meanwhile, the IBF declined to strip Peterson after a review of his medical records by IBF-appointed doctors ruled that the testosterone levels discovered in Peterson’s failed drug test were not at a level that would enhance his performance.

Kizer said that Bey’s case “will be on the commission’s agenda” on Feb. 28, the same day the organization reviews the case of former WBC middleweight titleholder Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., who tested positive for marijuana metabolites consistent with the use of the drug in the aftermath of September’s unanimous decision loss to RING champion Sergio Martinez in Las Vegas.

“[Bey] will be on the agenda for Feb. 28, just for a temporary suspension pending the final ruling. And whenever he’s ready, which I’m guessing will be in April, we’ll have a hearing on it,” said Kizer.

“He will have his opportunity to respond, and we’ll go from there. If the commission finds against him, he faces a possible or likely suspension, fine and getting the decision overturned into a no-contest.”

Like Chavez’s infraction, Bey’s could lead to a suspension, a fine or both by the NSAC. In fact, if found guilty, Chavez can be penalized or fined the entire amount of his $3 million purse, suspended for up to a year, or a combination thereof.

Chavez is being represented by Las Vegas-based Colby Williams and Don Campbell of the Campbell and Williams law firm.

Last month, Chavez’s attorneys requested that the fighter be suspended for no more than six months and fined no more than $10,000.

Lem Satterfield can be reached at lemuel.satterfield@gmail.com

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